Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Did the movie Take Me by Pat Healy and Mike Makowsky kidnap my kidnap plot?




A lot of people on Facebook are asking what the deal is with the new movie Take Me. Some fans actually think I was involved with the production. I was not, in any way, involved with this film. This post is meant to clarify that I do not know anyone involved with the film Take Me.

I am posting this not as an accusation, but for fans to explore the similarities between my work and theirs. I cannot make the 2015 TV pilot script or full TV series outline public, but there are more similarities within those documents. Fans have also pointed out parallels between the websites for both projects and fans are free to make up their own minds. Again, this post is to clarify to fans that I was not involved with the film Take Me in any way.

Don't read this synopsis if you haven't read So Say the Waiters or watched the new movie Take Me.

Take a guess what plot this is for.

A simulated kidnap company based in an LA suburb offers both kinky thrills and therapeutic abductions. Company is also web-based (and IRL users can email fictional a kidnapper on the company's website). There are two main characters: male kidnapper and female kidnappee. Newly-separated male kidnapper takes attractive female who turns the tables on him--the kidnap isn't what it seems! A sexual tension builds. Bungled kidnapping gone wrong! This female character is smarter than the kidnapper; she's in control; she's running the show. And low and behold, there are more kidnappers out there, working in different cities. In an ironic flip, the owner of the kidnap company is kidnapped. And then, in the surprise plot twist ending, the female main character offers to team up with male kidnapper to make his business more successful, also setting narrative up for expansion.

 


Thursday, February 16, 2017

Two Girls shirts and stickers



Two Girls shirts and stickers on TeeSpring

Starting in the year 2018, every person born has an identical twin. What was dubbed the mysterious Set Mutation is now, twenty years later, a worldwide phenomenon. Penny and Sam, two 16 year old twins, have never understood why they are different from one another. While all the other sets of twins grow to be more alike, in every way, Penny and Sam struggle to fit in--they aren't naturally the same person. Soon they will find out how deadly their secret really is.

Fiction Series, Dystopic, Young Adult,

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Two Girls is getting great reviews during its first week

GOODREADS: 
Two Girls (Two Girls #1) by Justin Sirois is a sci-fi adventure set in the near future that is really chilling. Manipulation of birth and genes, cover-ups, and murder if the heroes the readers are following get caught. All very exciting and lots of twists and exciting ending. Loved it all the way through.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1905455562




Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Weed / Whiskey / Dungeons / Dragons


TWO GIRLS is HERE



Starting in the year 2018, every person born has an identical twin. What was dubbed the mysterious Set Mutation is now, twenty years later, a worldwide phenomenon. Penny and Sam, two 16 year old twins, have never understood why they are different from one another. While all the other sets of twins grow to be more alike, in every way, Penny and Sam struggle to fit in—they aren’t naturally the same person. Soon they will find out how deadly their secret really is.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Amazon's Kindle Scout - editing with Amazon's Kindle Scout editors

It took about three weeks to get back my edits from the Kindle Scout team. Admittedly, I was a little nervous opening up the editorial letter, fearing that I would have to make major edits to the structure of the plot. Luckily, that wasn't the case. 

The editorial letter was very thorough. It both complemented the novel and gave thoughtful suggestions about clarifying motivations and story points. I was a little lucky as this is a series and much of what the editors wanted addressed does get solved in the second book. The letter was broken down into sections:



  1. Overview - overwhelmingly positive comments.
  2. Structure/Plot Flow - no changes here, the novel is a fairly straight ahead linear story.
  3. Characterization - great compliments on character evolution and realism .
  4. Tone and Style - no changes. 
  5. Dialogue - editor said this was one of the strongest elements of the novel.
  6. Grammar - typical consistency edits with m dashes v.s ellipses and such.
  7. Formatting - no edits there.
  8. Character List - editor made a detailed list of every character.

Overall, the track changes in the Word doc that I got back were easily accepted. The editor used the Chicago Style manual and paid close attention to consistency throughout. I basically accepted 99.9% of the edits and kept just a few that I felt were stylistically native to the series. The editor even commented positively in a few places which made me feel great.

I made a few edits of my own to clarify what the editor thought was foggy and submitted the novel yesterday. 


Amazon already updated Goodreads with Two Girls and the publishing date says March:


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33792520-two-girls


That seems right. 

IF you asked me what I thought of the whole editorial process with Kindle Scout, I'd say I was absolutely pleased by their level of attention. It makes sense. Amazon paid a $1,500 advance to me as well as paying an editor to go through a 300+ page novel. They don't just want to make their money back, they want to turn a profit. Editing Kindle Press books as well as they can only makes their investments more valuable. It's a win/win for me and Amazon.


The current plan is to see how Two Girls book 1 does and then hopefully submit book 2 to Kindle Scout this summer. Fingers crossed.



Thursday, January 5, 2017

Amazon's Kindle Scout - paperback rights and cover design with CreateSpace


One of the major perks of Kindle Scout is, when you get a publishing contract, you retain the paperback rights. This can be both positive and negative depending on your skill level. If you're not versed in self-publishing, then it might be a headache to navigate a platform that suites you best. Or it might be expensive to find a book cover designer.
I was excited to know that I have full control over the print version of Two Girls. With Severed Books already running for five years with So Say the Waiters, I have nearly all of my properties printing and selling through Amazon's Create Space website.
Knowing I'll get live updates of sales to books that I price myself is a relief. Making a little over $3 on a $11.99 sale through Amazon is a way better deal than any average author would get through a traditional contract. Without an agent in the way, I'll avoid the 10% off the top fee as well.